Friday, May 28, 2010

Nature's Pallete: Fiery Reds and Radiant Oranges

At the beginning of the week, temperatures soared and Chicago sweltered under a blazing hot sun. In keeping with this sizzling theme, I feature fiery red and radiant orange feathered friends.


The brilliant chili pepper red feathers of a male Scarlet Tanager


The throat of a Blackburnian Warbler reminds me of glowing embers


The blazing fire engine red cap of a Red-bellied Woodpecker


These Barn Swallows display beautiful terra cotta colored throats and subtle cantaloupe orange breast feathers


A Ruby-throated Hummingbird shows off his best iridescent asset


This female Balitmore Oriole is a lovely shade of butternut squash orange


The feathers of a male Balitmore Oriole are similar in color to sightly California poppies


The vibrant tangerine orange plumage of an American Redstart


The eyes of a Wood Duck resemble the lustrous red of a hibiscus flower


The deep pumpkin orange breast feathers of an American Robin

12 comments:

Steve Ingraham said...

great shots!

Cindy said...

Great post! Color coordinating shows everything in a new light. Just learned how colorful Barn Swallows are. Thanks for eye candy!

Sharon M said...

Spectacular!

JoanAHamilton said...

Stunning photography! Really enjoyed looking!

Pescalune said...

Wow ! Lot of beautiful birds there !! Great shots :)

Debbie Miller @HooootOwl said...

Hot series! ... the radiant redness shines through.

Laura K said...

STUNNING! WOW! What camera/lens do you use?

Julie G. said...

An appreciative thank you for all your nice comments. I feel especially grateful. I am using a Canon 7D with Canon EF 100 - 400mm lens.

Kenny said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Kenny said...

Brilliant work as usual Julie!

Idaho Birder said...

I just saw my first ever male American Redstart this weekend...three of them actually. What a cool looking bird and fun to watch too!

dreamfalcon said...

I love the colors of these photos! I believe it's easier when the sun is shining, isn't it?